Past Courses Taught

 
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I have taught five courses as lead instructor and seven as teaching assistant. This page provides links to my syllabi, a brief description of each course, student comments (when available), and sample assignments.

 
 
 
Click to see TA Training syllabus

Click to see TA Training syllabus

TA Training in Online Instruction

I built TA Training in Online Instruction, a non-credit graduate course, in partnership with The College of Letters & Science, L&S Learning Support Services, and DoIT Academic Technology. It prepared graduate instructors to teach effectively in an online course using the Canvas learning management software as well as other campus-supported learning technology (Kaltural Mediaspace, Google Apps, Bb Ultra). The one-week course was collaborative, cohort-based, and employed active learning methods. 

June 2017, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Student Comments  |  Course Evaluations

 

 
 
Click image to see the H223 syllabus

Click image to see the H223 syllabus

(HIST 223) European Imperialism

History 223 introduced students to nineteenth- and twentieth-century European imperialism. It provided a framework to better describe of how European empires helped shape modern world history, and explored the continuing influence European “empires” have on the world on which we live today.

Spring 2015, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Student Comments  |   Course Evaluations

Sample Assignments

Band Aid (1984) and The White Man's Burden
Advertising Empire
American and European Fascism

 
 
Click image to see the H212 syllabus

Click image to see the H212 syllabus

(HIST 212) World History 2

History 212 provided students an introduction to the major themes in the past 500 years of world history. The course contextualized major historical events, explored their significance, and facilitated the discussion of their importance for today. 

Fall 2012, Minot State University, Minot, ND

Student Comments

 

 
 
Click image to see the H101 syllabus

Click image to see the H101 syllabus

(HIST 101) Western Civilization to 1789

History 101 introduced students to the major themes of Western civilization from the early River Cultures up to the French Revolution. The course was designed so that students might be able to identify significant people, events, and periods of Western Civilization, and explain why they were significant. Furthermore, it provided a framework for students to improve their writing, develop strong, concise, effective arguments, and improve oral communication skills.

Fall 2012, Minot State University, Minot, ND

Student Comments

 
 
Click image to see the H104 syllabus

Click image to see the H104 syllabus

(HIST 104) United States History from 1865

History 104 introduced students to American history from the end of the Civil War through the Cold War. The course focused on the major events, movements, and personalities that shaped the United States's development. Students completing the course gained a better understanding of the country's origins as a nation and people, and its subsequent development. In addition, the course provided a framework for students to improve their writing, develop strong, concise, effective arguments, and improve oral communication skills.

Fall 2012, Minot State University, Minot, ND

Student Comments

 
 

Courses for which I have assisted


 
Click image to see the  R234 syllabus

Click image to see the R234 syllabus

 

(REL 234) Genres of Western Religious Writing

Spring Semesters 2009 - 2012, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Student Comments | 2009

 
 
Click image to see the H120 syllabus

Click image to see the H120 syllabus

 

(HIST 120) Modern Europe

Fall 2011, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Student Comments  |   Course Evaluations

 
 
Click image to see the H123 syllabus

Click image to see the H123 syllabus

 

(HIST 123) British History to 1688

Fall 2010, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Student Comments

 
 
Click image to see the H403 syllabus

Click image to see the H403 syllabus

 

(HIST 403) Immigration and Assimilation in US History

Fall 2008, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Student Comments